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To Achieve Supply Chain Resilience…Shift Your Focus from Cost to Risk Management

It wasn’t long ago that companies could keep watch on their component costs without having to give undue attention to supply chain logistics. All of that changed with the supply shortages and delays created by the arrival, in rapid succession, of the COVID-19 pandemic, climate-related events, and the Russian invasion of Ukraine, all of which highlighted the fragility of supply chains.

These disruptions have made it clear that supply chain risk management strategy must now be top of mind. As a recent article in the Harvard Business Review (HBR) put it, “As managers navigate this dynamic, they need to think beyond product costs and supplier choices.”

Some areas of supply chain risk that managers should address include:

  • Economic: Issues related to supplier health at every tier in the supply chain, including supplier bankruptcy or manufacturing stoppages
  • Geopolitical: The effects of international conflicts, such as U.S.-China trade issues and the war in Ukraine
  • Environmental: Issues related to natural disasters or sustainability, such as societal demand to reduce greenhouse gas emissions
  • Cybersecurity: Protecting against cyber threats to supply chain management

While many manufacturers previously approached their suppliers focused mainly on price, today they must develop a more strategic approach to achieve resilience, flexibility, and sustainability, said HBR. By focusing on supply chain risks, managers can learn to stabilize supply chain disruptions in the near term while developing structural resilience in the long term.

To do this, companies must have strategies that allow them to assess the risk of their suppliers, as well as to mitigate those risks, noted business benchmarking site Brainyard. Managers need to know what’s happening not only with their Tier 1 suppliers—the suppliers they work with directly—but also the Tier 2 and 3 suppliers further up the chain.

“Once an organization has assessed the risk of its supply chain partners, the best way to build resilience is to diversify its supplier base,” reported Brainyard. “That means finding redundant suppliers for key parts and materials that are located in different parts of the world so, for instance, a hurricane in a certain region doesn’t halt all shipments of a crucial material. It could also mean finding partners closer to home—maybe not in the same country but on the same continent.”

Diversifying the supplier base and keeping safety stocks on hand are costs that may be more expensive or hard to justify, but can be important for building structural resilience, risk management professionals at McKinsey & Company wrote recently.

Other actions that can be critical to building resilient supply chains include “creating a nerve center for the supply chain, simulating and planning for extreme disruptions, and reevaluating just-in-time strategies,” the McKinsey article noted.

With supply chain risks now firmly on the C-suite’s radar, leaders must not only create supply chain risk-reduction strategies, but also revisit and update them continually.

It’s only by taking steps to mitigate risk and find the best product options that you’ll achieve better business outcomes. Learn more about Dynamic’s portfolio of supply chain services designed to anticipate and mitigate internal and external risks.